Category Archives: Glen Grant

Because it’s a Wednesday, I feel like having some 66yo Glen Grant in my glass. 1948 was a good year, no?

 

Region – Speyside – ABV – 46.6% ABV

Glen Grant 66 years old 1948 cask # 1369

**UPDATE** Shortly after I posted about this whisky, an announcement has been made that a 65yo Glen Grant will be bottled/released by the same Wealth Solutions/Gordon & MacPhail team. I *just* received this email. Kismet!

I’ve been sitting on this sample of the Wealth Solutions/Gordon & MacPhail Glen Grant 66yo single malt for a bit over a year now.

There was never one singular moment in time that seemed like the right time to taste this. I’m not sure there would ever be *THE* right time to taste it.

Because of this, I’ve decided not to wait for the right time and just live in the now.

What’s happening now is happening now-now.

Back in May of 2014, there was quite a to-do when this single cask was released:

It makes good sense that this would be released with such fanfare. How often does 66yo whisky get released?

Answer: not often. It’s kind of a big deal.

Without further ado, here is my review of the 1948 Glen Grant, 66yo, cask # 1369:

On the nose — Well, it smells as amazing as you might expect. How does one explain what a 66yo whisky smells like? It goes beyond tasting notes (though we will get to that). You can smell the age here, but it’s not age, it’s oaken maturity.

The initial note that hits me is cocoa butter.  After this I detect muddled mint.  Hay clippings and clean horse stables.

Hidden far beneath a veil of lace-like peat is a wonderful note of key lime sorbet. Grape seed oil.

The warm soft bellies of my kitties – comforting.

In the mouth — Very light, fairly bright. The oak comes through but this in no way is popsicle stick dry. Medium oily mouthfeel.

Fruity, like an astro-pop and spearmint chews. The farmyardiness is gone and is replaced with a floral presence. Wild flowers, not pretty “forgive me” flowers.

Wonderfully nutty and the cocoa butter is detected in flavor, too. Getting more floral now as we near the finish.

Finish — Chamomile and hibiscus and UK smarties. Long. Wonderful.

In sum — Sort of amazing. It’s nice to know that after 66 years the wonderful Glen Grant character is quite present.

The fact that I am lucky enough to have been given a sample of this fine whisky blows my mind. Many, MANY, thanks to the good people at Wealth Solutions for thinking of me.


There actually is a “why” to explain my reasons for tasting this one right now. I raise this glass and experience to a very sick friend. A toast to you in the hopes that you may heal soon.

Taking a break from the Advent Calendar thing to have a sit with a solid little Glen Grant 10yo

 

Region – Speyside – ABV – 40%

I’ve been blogging every single day for the Scotch Whisky Advent Calendar and have decided, or at least thought, I needed a break!

Don’t get me wrong, it’s been a lot of fun, all of this blogging business.

Interestingly enough, however, now that I’m back into the blogging thing, I feel that I should be sharing my thoughts with the one whisky I just want to relax with – this here Glen Grant 10yo.

I forgot how fun it is to blog.

Here we go then!

Glen Grant 10yoOn the nose — Roasted almond richness with a little ginger spice lurking around the corners. Cigar wrapper meets pomelo pith.

Some salted peanuts – nice and warm.  Charred oak, and, is that frankincense?

In the mouth — A bit thin due to the ABV but it’s got this wonderfully delicate quality to it.

Glen Grant 10yoStraight-forwardly fruity with hints of fresh apple and ripe pears.  Perhaps some cherries a la tinned fruit. A hint of anise.

Finish — Medium in length. A touch of brine and burnt brush.

In sum — A solidly straight forward whisky that is perfect in the glass for any social setting. Would love to try this as a non-chill filtered whisky. But hey, I can not complain. Ten year old juice in my glass that is, in some ways, more mature than I am!

Two new ‘Old Malt Cask’ whiskies for the US Market: 36yo Glen Grant and a 28yo Dailuaine

 

I am fortunate in that I’ve had a few new samples of Old Malt Cask sent my way. (Hip Hop Hooray for me!!)

One of the single cask ranges as part of the Douglas Laing family of Independent Bottled whiskies, Old Malt Cask is somewhat unusual as they normally bottle their whisky at 50% ABV rather than cask strength.  Though not *that* unusual I suppose as Lombard’s does this as well.

The Old Malt Cask range of whiskies is one that has releases under the brand nearly every month (though the releases get spread out all over so the US might not see new OMC whiskies every month…).

Today we’re reviewing 2 of the four samples I’ve received.  Special thanks to the good folks at International Wine and Spirits for the samples!

OMC_dailuaine 28yr_bottleshotOld Malt Cask 28yo Dailuaine, refill hogshead, bottled at 50% ABV, 133 bottles $230 from Binnys.

On the nose –  Spicy, industrial, new newspapers, fresh ink.

Old-Malt-Cask-1Wow, I am smelling New York City on a dry, spring day.

Waft of perfume, new leaves, young flowers black pepper and a bit of pastrami sangwich to boot!

On the mouth –  One can only dream of a mouthfeel like this.  Much like the 27yo Dailuaine from Master of Malt, just a touch more oily.

Flavor wise, it’s very similar to that same MoM Dailuaine in that the Dailuaine qualities shine like a crazy diamond.  Spice, lots of it.

Old-Malt-Cask-2Raisins in light brown sugar with a touch of brown spice.

Spiced gum drops (minus the sugar coating).

Finish – A lightly spiced, medium length finish.

In sum – Dailuaine continues to impress the living bejebus out of me.  I’ve not met a Dailuaine I haven’t liked and this one is no exception.

This is another late summer dram for me…

OMC_glengrant36_bottleshotOld Malt Cask 36yo Glen Grant, Brandy Finished Butt, bottled at 50% ABV, 150 bottles

On the nose –  A touch floral but quite nutty (hazelnuts primarily).

Old-Malt-Cask-3Kefir leaves in coconut soup.  Very sweet and light malt, yellow berries, wood spice, seasoned oak.

While not the most complex, it’s still a very, very really loverly nose.

On the mouth –  I’ve seen the light!  Great mouthfeel!

Light, floral and nutty.  The style is somewhat reminiscent of an ex-bourbon Rosebank whisky.

You know you’re drinking an older whisky but this has a vibrancy that let’s itself be known by way of a fizzy-mouthfeel and ripe fruits.

Old-Malt-Cask-4Also in here we have some chamomile tea, baker’s chocolate and highly salted black licorice.

Finish – Lemoney pie crusts, medium long.

In sum – The cask seems to be less invasive on the spirit than I would have expected.  This is a great whisky here.  Glen Grant really has true character and they’ve captured it in this here cask.

This is a late summer dram.  One to enjoy sometime before lunchtime.

Two of the best “Thirty-Somethings” I’ve had in 2011 – One is a 35yo Glenglassaugh and the other a 37yo Glen Grant

Before the year is out, I wanted to make sure that I post up my reviews of two of my favorite whiskies I tasted this year.  Both are in their thirties and are from a single ex-sherry cask.  The Glen Grant was bottled by Duncan Taylor back in 2007 and the Glenglassaugh is an OB and is the first in a new set of releases entitled: “The Chosen Few“.

The first bottle in "The Chosen Few" series - Ronnie chose a damn fine cask of whisky - 35yo Sherry cask

You might my mentioning a little detail about Glenglassaugh’s “The Chosen Few” series a little while back.  As a reminder (and so as to toot my own horn):

When looking to name this series of single cask bottlings, Ronnie Routledge posted a contest on the Friends of Glenglassaugh Facebook page looking for a name for the range and yours truly (that’s me, Joshua Hatton, by the way) picked the winning name:  The Chosen Few.

Even if I hadn’t had the winning name I still would have chosen this whisky as one of my favorites for 2011:

Glenglassaugh – Highland region – The Chosen Few – Ronnie Routledge – 49.6%ABV£290 | $450

On the nose  There’s a good mix of interesting things going on in here.  A wood paneled pantry full of powdered sweets on a hot and humid summer’s day.

Lemony sugared pinwheels (or perhaps candied lemons – I love finding this note; you should try one sometime) as well as bruised, or perhaps, overripe peaches.

Tinned pineapple, walnut shells and huge notes of juicy mango.  More tropical that I expected.

Some wisps of smoke in the background (??).

My grandparent’s afghan from their finished basement storage somewhere around 1984.

You can smell the age here but it doesn’t smell old or tired in anyway.  All of those candied notes balance off the wood panel & stored afghan scents I got (which are not bad notes at all.  Left unbalanced by the sweetness well, then it’d be a different story…).  Lovely nose.

On the mouth Fantastic attack with a great combination of youthful fizziness (a seeming effervescence) and a strong sweetness (light fruit compote) without being cloying in anyway.

Licorice and spiced dried fruit pastries.  This is yummy,yummy, yummy stuff!!

A second sip in and I notice that the tannins kick in pretty quickly but that dryness is accompanied by some of those powder sugar candies I got on the nose (as Spock would say, Fascinating).

Finish Spicy and long on the finish.  Wow, really long with notes of spiced berries and even some cranberry/ginger relish in there.

In sum  Complex, intriguing and so very balanced.  Ronnie Routledge chose insanely well.  I was so sad to see my sample go.  I took my sweet time with it.  If you have the funds, I suggest you pick up a bottle and start exploring.

Special thanks goes out to Iain over at dramperday.com for the sample.  You can read his thoughts on this fine whisky right here (you’ll see that he LOVED it too).

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Glen Grant – Speyside region – 51.5%ABV – Duncan Taylor Cask # 3480 1970/2007$299

On the nose Forceful nose; like a high school senior boy after the prom.

Giving this just a little time to air out will make a difference, methinks.

Bitter cherries, cherry skins & stones/pits, prunes and potpourri.

Floral and bitter and deep inside notes of heated, over-cinnamoned apple sauce.

Oak furniture, fresh potting soil and party balloons.

A nicely sherried nose showing depth and age but I’m afraid that all of those bitter notes will prove over oaken on the palate.  Let’s see…

On the mouth I LOVE it when I’m wrong!  All sorts going on in here but let’s start off with the fact that this has a a nice oily mouthfeel from the outset.   Yes, it gets a bit dry but nowhere near as dry and oaky as I expected.  Thank G-d!

Now, on with the flavor:  Cherry Cola, honey reduction, Sweet cherry pie filling (minus the pie crust), the taste of the smell of potpourri, baked pear and solid rolled cinnamon bark.

No sign of sulphur, match sticks in this one.

Holiday brown bread and boozy raisins, walnuts and some dark chocolates.

Finish Long, spiced, really long… warming and soothing, oak and warmed butter biscuits.

In sum A fantastic single cask of whisky! This one surprised me.  I was truly expecting an over oaken old fuddy-duddy but no.  There’s a ton of personality and balance in here.  A well chosen cask!

Special thanks goes out to Mike W for the sample!!